ESSAY AND ESSAY INSTRUCTION ATTACHED BELOW. ALSO PLEASE READ INSTRUCTIONS I TYP


ESSAY AND ESSAY INSTRUCTION ATTACHED BELOW. ALSO PLEASE READ INSTRUCTIONS I TYPED BELOW FOR GUIDANCE
Make sure you rewrite the paragraphs about Anna Karenina and select specific moments and passages in the book where Kundera’s ideas of Lightness vs Weight is shown, especially with Dolly.
FOCUS ON THE PART OF ANNA KARENINA THATS LISTED ABOVE (PART 6) Edition we use for class is 00,
Suggestions from Professor:
1) Make sure that the basic distinction between lightness and weight is clear in your opening paragraph. To do that, you have to make it clear that, for Kundera, each has both a positive and negative side.
2) One implication of this four-part division is that when you use “lightness” and “weight” in your essay, when–for example–you’re talking about the “weight” of Dolly’s children, you’ll need to make clear which side of “weight” you’re talking about: the burdensome side, or the side that provides meaning. Of course it’s possible that in a given sentence you mean both positive and negative sides, in which case the word “weight” by itself is fine.
3) When you block quote a passage, you’re committing yourself to talking about the specifics of that passage. If not, why bother to quote it? By “specifics,” I don’t just mean plot points. Think, for example, of the difference between saying “Stiva smiled” and saying “Stiva’s face smiled.” In the latter, Tolstoy is pointing to the involuntary, mechanical aspect of Stiva’s response. So, when you’re talking about a passage you’ve quoted, you want to draw our attention to the things that make this passage convey a particular meaning. As a thought experiment, you could try to summarize the passage in under twenty words. Then, notice what’s lost in that reduction. The things that are lost—the tone, the specific phrases used, for example—are things you want to draw our attention to, insofar as they relate to the issue you’re talking about.
4) Many writing problems will be solved by writing shorter sentences. Get comfortable with sentences that have 15 or fewer words. If you have a chance to use a period rather than a comma—that is, if you can stop a sentence and then start a new one—always pick the period. This won’t just sharpen your writing. It will also sharpen your thinking.
5) Finally, I’m seeing a few semicolon problems. Here’s the test, if you can replace a semicolon with a period and have a complete sentence before the period and a complete sentence after the period, you’re good to go. If you can’t do that, something’s wrong. A semicolon is to a period what a latched screen door is to a latched regular door. They’re both doors. They both stop you. A comma is like a swinging door, you can walk through it.


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